Fuck yes maps!
We are a boy and two girls, and we blog about maps because they're awesome.

If you love maps too, you may want to check out our archive, which contains over 2,000 different maps!
Tuesday, April 22, 2014

travelingcolors:

Standardized Metro Maps Around the World (by Jug Cerovic)

French-Serbian architect Jug Cerovic has standardized international subway maps with INAT, a guideline developed to unify the global metro network with easy to read and memorize charts. Each city’s center is enlarged, to make room for the multiplicity of lines and connecting stations. A standard set of symbols is applied to each map including the line colors, stations, connections and station labeling. Angles are gently curved for a smooth familiar look and linear paths are represented vertically, horizontally, or 45, with no more than 5 bends on their entire length. Highly representative shapes are used for specific ubran features: a ring for Moscow and Paris, a parallelogram for London, and regularly spaced parallel lines for gridded street patterns like new York. All text is labelled in both local and latin characters and are legible on small sized prints for pocket use and suitable for display on a wide array of supports.

Thursday, April 10, 2014
theatlantic:

What’s Closer To Texas Than Texas Is To Itself?

This map shows (roughly) how large the Lone Star State is. Points in the map’s red section are closer to somewhere in Texas than the opposite sides of Texas are to each other.
That’s right: You can be in Fargo, or Atlanta, or San Diego … and be closer to Texas than Texas is to itself.
That’s what the map above says. Texas is big.
Read more. [Image: mostwrong / Reddit]

theatlantic:

What’s Closer To Texas Than Texas Is To Itself?

This map shows (roughly) how large the Lone Star State is. Points in the map’s red section are closer to somewhere in Texas than the opposite sides of Texas are to each other.

That’s right: You can be in Fargo, or Atlanta, or San Diego … and be closer to Texas than Texas is to itself.

That’s what the map above says. Texas is big.

Read more. [Image: mostwrong / Reddit]

Friday, April 4, 2014
Wednesday, April 2, 2014
willigula:

Detail of Île de la Cité, Le Marais, and Quartier latin from a map of Paris, 1550.
Note that the map is rotated so that north is to the left. You can view the entire original at Old Maps of Paris

willigula:

Detail of Île de la Cité, Le Marais, and Quartier latin from a map of Paris, 1550.

Note that the map is rotated so that north is to the left. You can view the entire original at Old Maps of Paris

Monday, March 31, 2014
barthschwein:

It’s been 6 years since I’ve been to Sydney. But I obviously remember it like yesterday.

barthschwein:

It’s been 6 years since I’ve been to Sydney. But I obviously remember it like yesterday.

Thursday, March 27, 2014
oupacademic:

Waldseemüller‘s Map of the World, 1507. Best known for a famous mistake—incorrectly naming the Western Hemisphere “America”—this map displays ignorance of many features that had been well known and correctly drawn by nautical map makers for decades, and in some cases, centuries.
From The Oxford Map Companion: One Hundred Sources in World History by Professor Patricia Seed, which illustrates how peoples and cultures throughout the human past have imagined their worlds through a diverse collection of historical maps from the Paleolithic to the present.

oupacademic:

Waldseemüller‘s Map of the World, 1507. Best known for a famous mistake—incorrectly naming the Western Hemisphere “America”—this map displays ignorance of many features that had been well known and correctly drawn by nautical map makers for decades, and in some cases, centuries.

From The Oxford Map Companion: One Hundred Sources in World History by Professor Patricia Seed, which illustrates how peoples and cultures throughout the human past have imagined their worlds through a diverse collection of historical maps from the Paleolithic to the present.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Monday, March 24, 2014
Marc Khachfe sent us this beautiful nighttime map of London. It’s not a photo, but a composition he created using Open Street Map data. Here’s what Marc told us about it:

No images were used in its creation, just raw OSM data and my 3D animation/2D compositing knowledge. I loved the images taken of cities at night by the astronauts on the International Space Station and wanted to print out a large poster. But I found the images too blurry and not big enough to print, so I set about replicating them!

You can view more of his work on Flickr, or buy his prints on Etsy.

Marc Khachfe sent us this beautiful nighttime map of London. It’s not a photo, but a composition he created using Open Street Map data. Here’s what Marc told us about it:

No images were used in its creation, just raw OSM data and my 3D animation/2D compositing knowledge. I loved the images taken of cities at night by the astronauts on the International Space Station and wanted to print out a large poster. But I found the images too blurry and not big enough to print, so I set about replicating them!

You can view more of his work on Flickr, or buy his prints on Etsy.

 
Into the past